'But being right may be like walking backwards proving where you've been.'

Being right, being wrong. Why does being neither mean so much? Especially that of the former. After a few months out of university, I am able to see that being right is valued by a majority of professionals in the working world. It's even more valuable, that other's view the person of question, as right.

However, being right doesn't look good, especially if you're not management. When you're bottom of the rung, being right has as much use as winning an anonymous twitter feud. Everyone's a bit bruised and no one really likes you in the end. Unless they enjoy being wrong.
But, what do you know—according to Paul Arden being wrong is the way to go.

'Of course, being wrong is a risk.'
'Risks are a measure of people. People who won't take them are trying to preserve what they have.
People who take them often end up by having more.
Some risks have a future, and some people call them wrong. But being right may be like walking backwards proving where you've been. Being wrong isn't the future, or in the past. Being wrong isn't anywhere but being here. Best place to be, eh?'

Good words Paul.